Governor Hogan Brings Rapid Recovery To Maryland

Maryland Governor Larry Hogan faced plenty of challenges when he took office. His predecessor, Democrat presidential candidate Martin O’Malley, left him with plenty of messes to clean up, including a lagging private sector and a number of arcane and unpopular taxes. To make matters much worse, in June 2015 Governor Hogan announced his diagnosis with an aggressive form of lymph node cancer.

Fortunately, today the governor’s cancer is in remission and the Maryland economy is on a much brighter path. And while the governor deserves significant credit for his accomplishments, the Maryland victory is shared equally by the job creators who want to make the Old Line State a viable place in which to work and live.

Read the full article on Forbes.com here

Gov. Kasich’s Track Record In Ohio Gives Clear Indication Of National Leadership Potential

The governor’s laser-like focus on reducing taxes – particularly income taxes – in the Buckeye State informs his performance on the debate dais as well as in his recent year-end review. In that speech, Kasich emphasized his commitment to making Ohio more business-friendly. He told the audience: “We killed the income tax for small business. We have to lower the income tax more.”

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Florida’s Steady and Uprising Sunshine

While some states’ economic outlooks appear cloudy at best, Florida’s financial future remains bright. This week the Florida Chamber of Commerce released the details of its 2016 Competitiveness Agenda, a detailed legislative blueprint that dovetails nicely with Governor Rick Scott’s pro-growth plans. The Chamber’s agenda offers strong support for two key Scott initiatives: a call for $1 billion in tax cuts to attract new businesses to the state.

Importantly, neither the Chamber nor the Governor show any sign of slowing down on their pro-growth agendas. Florida’s recent successes are encouraging those in business leadership and civic leadership to double down on their efforts to ensure that Florida’s economy continues to rebound at its current quick pace. Late last year, the Sunshine State surpassed New York as the third-most populous state in the nation. Each day, Florida grows by more than 800 people. The 2016 “State Business Tax Climate Index” from the nonprofit Tax Foundation once again ranks Florida among the top ten; this year, Florida takes the number-four spot thanks to its business-friendliness and nonexistent individual income tax.

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Oklahoma Looking To Stabilize Tax For Greater Economic Growth

Oklahoma Looking To Stabilize Tax For Greater Economic Growth

Rex SinquefielldUnstable revenue streams can wreak havoc on a state’s economic position and potential for growth. This is the concern for many legislators in Oklahoma, a state heavily reliant on taxes related to the energy sector. As a result, legislators are considering more predictable revenue streams.

Oklahoma State Representative Mark McCullough, who recently announced that he will not seek re-election in 2016, has committed to spending a good deal of his last 12 months in office focused on stabilizing the Sooner State’s budget. He put it bluntly: “We are really in the hole this year, and I imagine most of my time will be spent on that.”

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Arizona: When Coming in #10 Right Now Would be Great News

Arizona: When Coming in #10 Right Now Would be Great News

 

Rex SinquefielldIt’s been nearly a decade since Arizona lowered its personal state income taxes, and now the Grand Canyon State sits poised to become the tenth state in the union to eliminate personal income tax all together. With members of the House and Senate working collaboratively, and a fiscally conservative governor in the capital, Arizona’s upcoming legislative session could see the enactment of sweeping change.

The nonprofit, nonpartisan Tax Foundation grants Arizona some pretty decent boasting rights, with the 13th-lowest individual income tax and the 10th-lowest state and local income tax in the nation. However, eliminating the income tax would give Arizona an even greater competitive advantage when luring businesses, creating jobs, and encouraging new investments. In the past, Arizona’s neighbor Nevada has been a perennial champion of business growth, thanks to a penchant for cutting and eliminating taxes. However, those days may be over, as earlier this year Senate lawmakers passed Governor Brian Sandoval’s plan to raise $438 million in taxes a year.

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High State Income Tax Rates Discourage Philanthropists, Fuel Bureaucrats

6f023ae6c5ee5e7b888463966d1375e6When discussing matters of public policy and taxation, we often draw the correlation between high tax rates and undesirable economic climates. While it is certainly true that burdensome tax rates cause businesses and workers to seek better opportunities in different places, it is also true – and far less frequently discussed – that high state income tax rates have a negative impact on charitable giving. States with already high (or steadily increasing) tax rates and low adjusted gross income (AGI) growth levels see less charitable giving than those with low tax rates and faster AGI growth levels.

A new policy study from the American Legislative Exchange Council does an excellent job laying out the facts and figures that show the relationship between tax burdens and charitable giving. Tellingly, a one percent increase in the personal income tax burden correlates with 0.35 percent decrease in charitable giving. Even more troubling, when all state taxes are placed within this equation, an increase of 1 percent in the total tax burden is associated with a 1.16 percent drop in charitable giving, per dollar, of state income.

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Anti-Growth ‘Make It Fair’ Lobby Pushes For $9 Billion Tax Increase In California

Anti-Growth ‘Make It Fair’ Lobby Pushes For $9 Billion Tax Increase In California

California voters approved the People’s Initiative to Limit Property Taxation (Proposition 13) in 1978. To this date, Proposition 13 stands as one of the most important advances in the history of American tax reform. The initiative, which decreased property taxes by assessing homes at their 1975 value, allowed thousands of families to stay in their homes; the skyrocketing property taxes would have forced many Californians (particularly working-class families and seniors on a fixed income) to move. Proposition 13 was (and is) so popular among California residents that many politicians consider it a “third rail” – changing or weakening it seems virtually unthinkable.

Yet, there is a group thinking about changing Prop 13: a labor-union-backed organization called Make It Fair. Using scare tactics and us-against-them rhetoric to garner support, Make It Fair contends that loopholes in Proposition 13 allow a small number of “giant corporations” and “wealthy commercial property owners” to get around paying the property taxes that they could easily afford. In reality, though, the “loopholes” that Make It Fair seeks to close are in place to protect residential and commercial real-estate owners at all places on the economic ladder. Their desired legislation (Senate Constitutional Amendment 5), which stalled in Sacramento, would create a steep tax increase for many property owners. That notion is unacceptable. Proposition 13 keeps small business owners’ doors open, even when the economy presents a variety of struggles – and it’s been providing this security for nearly 40 years.

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Why The Fair Tax Approach Will Supercharge North Carolina’s Economy

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory shows a strong commitment to tax reform. From the bill he signed in 2013 – which transformed the state’s income tax from a multi-rate mess to a logical flat-rate tax, among other pro-growth changes – to his current leadership as the North Carolina legislature hammers out budget details, McCrory brings a disciplined approach to improving his state’s economy.

As the House and Senate determine the particulars of the new state budget, some disagreements have arisen. Certainly, the conservatives leading both chambers agree that reform is necessary; they want to see lower taxes and reduced government spending. Yet they are divided when it comes to approach. There are basically three factions: the “Fair Taxers,” the “Flat Taxers,” and the “Balanced Taxers.” The Fair Taxers would like to eliminate North Carolina’s state income tax entirely, and introduce a broad-based sales tax on retail goods and services. The Flat Taxers wish to keep the single marginal rate, as well as properly redefine the tax base in order to prevent the double-taxation of investment income. The Balanced Taxers find the strategies of the Fair Taxers and Flat Taxers too bold, and instead advocate for a diverse portfolio of state revenue sources.

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Why You Don’t Want To Be in California’s One Percent.

Tax reform isn’t exactly something we associate with California. With the highest income-tax rate in the nation (and the third-worst overall state business tax climate, per the Tax Foundation’s most recent rankings), the Golden State offers plenty of practical lessons in how not to run an economy. However, California State Controller Betty Yee recently suggested tax reform that shows a clear understanding of the peril facing California’s economy – and offers ideas that could restore energy and momentum to a sluggish state business climate.

Yee, a Democrat, wants to broaden the state tax base. California bureaucrats have grown far too accustomed to relying on the top 1 percent, treating them as “cash cows” for the treasury. Yee views this approach as both shortsighted and unsustainable, particularly given the wild fluctuations in the incomes of the rich (which dip or soar based on capital losses or capital gains, and which are the most mobile of American incomes).

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